Telephone Response Guide for Clinics

See page XX for corresponding phone script.

A. No symptoms/not sick

This telephone triage service is intended for people who are ill or caring for someone who is ill. For general information about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), please refer to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website. Do you have something to write with? The CDC’s website is www.cdc.gov/COVID19.

NOTE: If the caller is a healthcare professional, has no symptoms, but reports exposure to an ill person without using recommended personal protective equipment (PPE) precautions, then provide this advice: Contact an occupational health provider or your supervisor in your healthcare facility as soon as possible for instructions.

B. Call 911 (Emergency Medical Services)

Immediate medical attention is needed. You need to call 911 now. Tell the 911 operator if you have been in contact with someone with COVID-19 or if you have recently been to an area where COVID-19 is spreading.

For general information about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), please refer to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

Consider Follow Up Based on your clinic/practice, usual protocol, and/or guidance from your Medical Director, consider placing follow-up calls to any patient advised to contact their provider to ensure that they sought medical advice, assess if their condition has improved or worsened, and to determine final disposition.

C. Child less than 2 years old

This telephone triage is intended for children who are at least two years old and adults. If your child is younger than two years old and is sick, please contact their medical provider as soon as possible.

If your child has had contact with a person who is sick with COVID-19 or has been in an area with community spread of COVID-19, please let their medical providers know.

You can find more information about COVID19 on CDC’s website. Do you have something to write with? The CDC’s website is www.cdc.gov/COVID19.

Consider Follow Up – Based on your clinic/practice, usual protocol, and/or guidance from your Medical Director, consider placing follow-up calls to any patient advised to contact their provider to ensure that they sought medical advice, assess if their condition has improved or worsened, and to determine final disposition.

D. Go to the Emergency Department

Urgent medical attention is needed. You need to go to your nearest emergency department.

If you have had contact with a person who is sick with COVID-19 or you have been in an area with community spread of COVID-19, please let your medical providers know as soon as you arrive at the emergency department.

For general information about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), please refer to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

Consider Follow Up – Based on your clinic/practice, usual protocol, and/or guidance from your Medical Director, consider placing follow-up calls to any patient advised to contact their provider to ensure that they sought medical advice, assess if their condition has improved or worsened, and to determine final disposition.

E. Contact a medical provider within 24 hours

You have some symptoms that may be related to COVID-19.

  • If no high-risk conditions, skip to table below.
  • If the patient has a high-risk condition (g., > 65 years old, currently pregnant or up to 2 weeks after the end of pregnancy, or has an underlying medical condition) –
    • You also have medical conditions that could put you at greater risk for complications from COVID-19, such as(your age >65 years old, being pregnant or recently pregnant, having an underlying medical condition).
    • Please let your provider know about (your age or this condition).

AND

patient belongs or not to clinic
If the patient belongs to your practice or clinic OR If the patient does not belong to your practice or clinic
A healthcare provider from this practice/clinic will follow-up with you within 24 hours. If you are not contacted by a provider within 24 hours, come in to see your provider.

 

If your symptoms get worse, seek care by an urgent care center or emergency department.

 

If you have had contact with a person who is sick with COVID-19 or have been in an area with community spread of COVID-19, please let your provider know as soon as you speak with them.

Contact your usual healthcare provider, doctor’s office, clinician advice line, or telemedicine provider to discuss your symptoms.

 

If you do not receive a call back within 24 hours, go in to see your medical provider. If your symptoms get worse, seek care at an urgent care center or emergency department.

 

If you have had contact with a person who is sick with COVID-19 or you have been in an area with community spread of COVID-19, please let your medical providers know as soon as you speak with them.


AND

  • In the meantime, follow these steps to prevent others in your household or community from getting sick:
    • Stay home except to get medical care
      You should stay home until you talk with your usual healthcare provider or another medical provider. In the meantime, restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
    • Separate yourself from others in your home
      As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.
    • Wear a facemask, if possible
      If you have cough, runny nose, or sneezing, wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and especially before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room.
    • Cover your coughs and sneezes
      Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately wash your hands.
    • Clean your hands often
      Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Avoid sharing personal household items
      You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.
    • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday
      High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
    • Monitor your symptoms
      Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing). Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting sick.

Consider Follow Up – Based on your clinic/practice, usual protocol, and/or guidance from your Medical Director, consider placing follow-up calls to any patient advised to contact their provider to ensure that they sought medical advice, assess if their condition has improved or worsened, and to determine final disposition.

F. Contact the occupational health provider at your workplace immediately

Contact an occupational health provider in your healthcare facility as soon as possible.

If you have cared for a person who is sick with COVID-19 or have been in an area with community spread of COVID-19, please let your occupational health provider know as soon as you speak with them

If your facility does not have an occupational health provider, seek care with your usual provider.

Be sure to mention that you have symptoms and work in a healthcare facility or with patients. If your symptoms get worse, seek care by an urgent care center or emergency department, but call ahead to let them know you are sick, work in a healthcare setting, and may have had exposure to COVID-19.

In the meantime, you can follow some steps to prevent others in your household or community from getting sick. Do you have something to write with?

  • Stay home except to get medical care –
    You should stay home until you talk with your usual healthcare provider or another medical provider. In the meantime, restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
  • Separate yourself from others in your home –
    As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Wear a facemask, if possible –
    If you have cough, runny nose, or sneezing, wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and especially before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes –
    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately clean your hands.
  • Clean your hands often –
    Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items –
    You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday –
    High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
  • Monitor your symptoms –
    Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing). Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting sick.

You can find more information about COVID19 on CDC’s website – www.cdc.gov/COVID19.

Consider Follow Up – Based on your clinic/practice, usual protocol, and/or guidance from your Medical Director, consider placing follow-up calls to any patient advised to contact their provider to ensure that they sought medical advice, assess if their condition has improved or worsened, and to determine final disposition.

G. Contact a healthcare provider in the long-term care facility where you live

You may be at higher risk for severe illness since you live in a nursing home /long-term care facility.

Tell a caregiver at the facility that you are sick and need to see a medical provider as soon as possible.

In the meantime, you can follow some steps to prevent others in your household or community from getting sick. Do you have something to write with?

  • Stay in your room except to get medical care – You should stay in your room/apartment until you talk with the healthcare provider in your facility.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes – Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately clean your hands.
  • Clean your hands often – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

You can find more information about COVID19 on CDC’s website – www.cdc.gov/COVID19.

Consider Follow Up – Based on your clinic/practice, usual protocol, and/or guidance from your Medical Director, consider placing follow-up calls to any patient advised to contact their provider to ensure that they sought medical advice, assess if their condition has improved or worsened, and to determine final disposition.

H. Stay home and take care of yourself. Call your provider if you get worse.

Sorry you’re feeling ill. You have one or more symptom(s) that may be related to COVID-19.

Stay home and take care of yourself. You can follow some steps to prevent others in your household or community from getting sick. Do you have something to write with?

  • Drink plenty of water and other clear liquids to prevent fluid loss (dehydration).
  • Treat fever and cough with medicines you can buy at the store. Follow the directions on the label.
  • Stay home except to get medical care
    You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
  • Separate yourself from others in your home
    As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Wear a facemask, if possible
    If you have cough, runny nose, or sneezing, wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and especially before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you, or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes –
    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately clean your hands.
  • Clean your hands often
    Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items – 
    You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using these items,…

Read more…

19 Total Views 1 Views Today